My Favorite YA Books

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An Organic List.

(in random order)

  • The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins–A dystopian yet very human world where a yearly lottery pits teens from different districts against each other in an unimaginable death match. And yet, from horrible conditions, the teens find a way to fight a corrupt leader.
  • Please Excuse Vera Dietz by A. S. King. King is a local, Pennsylvania author, in tune with teen problems and having a unique knack for character arcs and plot that is satisfyingly real and honest.
  • Divergent by Veronica Roth. In a future world, the main character has a personality made up of more than one “aspect,” and being different is fatal in this society.
  • The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton. This breakthrough book is a requirement at most high schools to this day. The themes and truths of the novel are timeless.
  • Lord of the Flies by William Golding. I recommend this novel for its searing answer to the question: What happens to a small society when left alone on a deserted island? A classic, but disturbing.
  • The Giver by Lois Lowery. This furturistic classic reveals a society controlled in knowledge, power, and freedom. But there is one man who remembers everything: the good and the bad.
  • The Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling. These books speak for themselves, and in my opinion, the movies are almost their equal.
  • Holes by Louis Sachar. It’s a case of wrongful accusation, and things look bad for the young protagonist as he’s a prisoner somewhere in the desert. Fortunately, he’s about to unlock an old-time mystery that may set him free.
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl. Written by the author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and James and the Giant Peach, Matilda is all alone and would probably disappear into the floor cracks if it were not for her special “power” and one kind teacher.
  • To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The sequel to this novel has become controversial; however, Lee’s original book remains a testament to the reality of race relations in the United States.
  • Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery. This book and its sequels remain a beautiful read for younger teens. (And adults)

Remember, there is something wonderful for everyone to read, but you may have to look for it!

What are your favorite childhood or young adult books?