And Another Thing…

To the Doubters: I should make it clear at the start that I watched every single Apollo launch from home or from a black and white television placed on a big stand at the front of the school auditorium. It didn’t matter how long the launch took. Every single elementary class was present to watch. I clearly remember as Neil Armstrong delicately stepped out of the lunar module, and years later, I was astounded that such a fragile creation could even fly much less land on the moon. As a girl, I was scared every time a Saturn rocket was launched because no amount of explanation could convince me that it hadn’t blown up on the launch pad. And then, there was Challenger. My daughter was three, and I didn’t let her watch it. She wouldn’t have understood what had happened or that the first teacher in space had just become a hero in death. Some people didn’t care then. More don’t care now, but I believe in the space program, and I always will. I will never have to courage to leave this planet, even if it is being destroyed under my feet. I’ll just wave good-bye. The Apollo 11 moon landing was not produced on a sound stage. It was real. There were thousands of people who worked their butts off to make Presiden John F. Kennedy’s mission a reality. Apollo 1 killed three astronauts on the launch pad. There was a short in a wire, and there was no way for them to escape. If you don’t believe it, NASA has photos of the bodies. No. Too many people gave their lives and time with their families to put people on the moon. A soundstage? If NASA had done that, someone would have blabbed. Someone would have taken a bribe and told. As it is, there was a mole who sent many of our rocketry plans to Russia, or as it was known then, the USSR. Do you think the men in Apollo 13 faked their near-fatal mission, too? You say, there’s nothing there? On the moon? How do you know? All we have left now is a Space Station. Scientists and astronauts do a lot of great work on that station. But we don’t send people up there and back on our own rockets. They hitch a ride with other countries, so I guess that puts the International in the International Space Station. It should be an international effort. And I hope my children and grandchildren stay up late to watch the first manned mission to Mars.